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November 1998

Top 100 Mag

S-T-U

Computer & Software WWW Magazines & Journals


Top 100*100
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S

Magazine 98 Web Influence 96 Web Influence 30-month Shift MIPS*

Outline/Quotes

Ed. - Editorial comments

SCO World:

UNIX Business Solutions

91 N/A N/A Ernest H. Rice

Administering Your System via the Web

The biggest problem is diversity. The commands issued on the remote system are not always consistent among Unix versions. In most cases there are options to get a specific output. However, the options may differ from system to system.
Shift 72 69 -3 Barnaby Marshall

Whither the Browser?

Justice should split Microsoft into two parts, an OS and Application division, and then quietly remove itself from the picture, silencing the critics and clearing the way for the next stage in the battle for silicon supremacy.
Service News 69 86 +17 Fred Van Bennekom

The color of feedback

Capturing customer feedback should not be a casual exercise. Specific events should be examined in detail, but the best organizations actively solicit feedback to maximize their learning opportunities.
SunWorld Online 19 34 +15 Rebecca Sykes and James Niccolai

AOL, Sun, Netscape stress friends, not enemy

The cooperation between AOL, Netscape and Sun is very much about Microsoft. Scott McNealy, Sun's president, chief executive officer and chairman, did not hesitate to trumpet the new life he said the deal will bring to Java.


Ed. - If you put three CEOs obsessed with Microsoft in one room, what do you think they talk about?

Sys Admin 64 N/A N/A Chris Hare

IT Security Coming of Age

Fundamentally, information security is in the hands of the users. Regardless of the measures that may be implemented, carelessness of individuals involved in the preparation, consolidation, processing, recording, or movement of information may compromise any or all security measures.

T

Magazine 98 Web Influence 96 Web Influence 30-month Shift MIPS*

Outline/Quotes

Tech Links 95 N/A N/A Nick Vance

WebSight:He got 'Hire' with a Little Help from His Friends

E-mail remains the most popular Internet feature by far. It's laughably faster than regular mail, eliminates "phone tag," and is more efficient and less obtrusive than a fax. Its uses are limited only by your imagination. Read how one savvy executive used e-mail to recruit a manager for a new project on short notice.
Technology Review 84 N/A N/A Simson L. Garfinkel

The Web's Unelected Government

A little-known group that holds closed meetings is the closest thing the Web has to a central authority. The consortium, known to insiders as W3C, has at last count 275 member organizations, including companies, nonprofit organizations, industry groups and government agencies from all over the world.

Ed. - Big Brother is here. And he brought his brothers.

tele.com 61 N/A N/A Steven Titch

It's Your Move

In every office, in every cubicle, there are still two wall jacks that connect to two networks. And that continues to bug the hell out of everybody.

Ed. - They're concerned about the wall jacks, but not the fact they are in cubicles?

Think Leadership (IBM) 96 N/A N/A Nick Donofrio

The Next Big Thing

It's going to happen–a trillion devices connected to the Net. These devices will include smart cards and cell-phones. But they also will be things you might not expect, like cars, vending machines, buildings, all with embedded microprocessors, all joined to a network.

Ed. - For the reading-impaired, you can download audio clips to hear the narrations of this well illustrated story.

ThinWorld 81 N/A N/A Jim Crocco

The New Challenger to Desktop PCs

While many may not yet know about thin-client computing, industry analysts say thin clients will account for more than 20 percent of the entire desktop market by the year 2002. An industry watcher, Zona Research Inc., estimates that the worldwide thin-client market will experience an increase of more than 350 percent next year, jumping from $582 million in 1998 to over $2 billion in 1999.
TidBITS 29 7 -22 Matt Deatherage

Who Do You Antitrust?

Exploitation of workers was a staple of Adam Smith's era also, but in Smith's economy, such business owners could be held personally responsible for their actions. Today that responsibility lies with the corporations themselves, and corporations can be punished only economically unless specific charges can be proven against specific people. The buck stops nowhere, and lack of responsibility leads to a lack of social conscience.

Ed. - The buck stops where the CEO says  it does.

U

Magazine 98 Web Influence 96 Web Influence 30-month Shift MIPS*

Outline/Quotes

UGeek 93 N/A N/A Does e-commerce pay? Intel says, "YES!" What's exciting about this is that it shows that Intel was able to convince its customers to buy over $1 billion worth of merchandise over the Internet. This is definitely a statement that companies trust the Internet (or an extranet) as a viable purchasing mechanism.

Ed. - $1 Billion? Big deal... Intel makes that in 9 days...

Upside 25 19 -6 Richard L. Brandt

So Long, Jim Barksdale

Assuming the merger goes through, it's time to say goodbye to Jim Barksdale. He joins the AOL board, but he will no longer play a managerial role at Netscape. After the transition, it's so long, Jim. That's a shame. I like the guy. But I think he's acknowledging reality by moving on. Netscape would have been killed by Microsoft.
User Friendly Online 90 N/A N/A Gordon Missimer


Microsoft 'tell all' arrives
just in time for trial

Wendy Goldman Rohm: The Microsoft File: Using largely unnamed sources, she writes about how Gates allegedly used every trick in a monopolist's book to force computer manufacturers to sell his software and deny the public innovation. The book also details how Microsoft blatantly copied competitors' products. But  if you're looking for the "smoking gun," you won't find one in "The Microsoft File."

Ed. - Did you try looking under Bill's bed?

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